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Module Component Self-Assessment

Updated

Does your module have the recommended components? Have you considered all the angles? This checklist provides an overview of elements that should appear in your module (or, at least, be considered before having them not included).

This checklist is an evaluation tool to ensure the inclusion of the recommended components of an e-learning module. The parameters are divided into the following categories:

  1. Introduction and Learning Outcomes
  2. Assessments, Activities, and Interactions
  3. Design, Media, and Technology
  4. Accessibility

This checklist can be used at several times during your project. During development, the checklist can be self-administered to ensure completion of key elements. It can also be used as a final evaluation method for your module.

Introduction and Learning Outcomes


Yes/No?
Learning objectives clearly state content to be learned.

Learning outcomes map to learning objectives.
Learning objectives use action verbs.

Language used is clear, descriptive, free of grammatical or spelling errors, and is not gender specific.
New and/or complex language and/or terminology is defined (reference can be made to glossary) and used appropriately.

Length of module is purposefully considered (usually 30 minutes or less, including activity completion).

Citations or references are used.

Stats, facts, and dates have been checked and referenced.
Multiple engagement elements are used (e.g.,relevant use of images, narration, storytelling, humor, examples, and emotional impact).

Assessments, Activities, and Interactions


Yes/No?
Design layout is effective (e.g., text and images do not overlap, font is readable, effective balance of white space and content, images, or text.)

Module navigation instructions are clearly explained.

Content is “chunked” into similar units of information.

Content logically progresses throughout the module.

Explicit information is provided regarding expectation for learners when performing an activity.

There are possibilities for self-assessment and/or reflection of learners’ performance during the module.

Introduction clearly outlines the estimated time required to complete the module (when appropriate/predictable).

Any requirements and/or prerequisite knowledge for the module are listed.

Multiple knowledge checks such as quizzes or interactive learning elements are interspersed throughout the module.

When knowledge checks are used, descriptive feedback is provided (e.g., help the learner understand the concept through explanation, reinforcement, or redirection).

Design, Media, and Technology


Yes/No?
Module navigation instructions are clearly explained.

Navigation allows learners to understand their position within the module.

Design layout is effective (e.g., text and images do not overlap, font is readable, effective balance of white space and content, images, or text.)

Learners have the possibility to self-direct their navigation through the module.

Size and type of utilized font is comfortable for reading.

Content is “chunked” into similar units of information.

Content logically progresses throughout the module.

Interactive elements function properly (e.g., links, buttons, hover, click).

Multiple engagement elements are used (e.g.,relevant use of images, narration, storytelling, humor, examples, and emotional impact).

Images or videos are of good quality (e.g., focus, lighting, and background).

Audio is of good quality (e.g., volume, vocal quality [tone, pace, inflection], background noise does not distract).

Images or videos are of good quality (e.g., focus, lighting, and background).

Accessibility


Yes/No?
Closed captioning and a written transcript for audio and video components are available.

Multiple interactive (AODA compliant) learning elements are used.

All hyperlink text is descriptive (i.e., not simply “click here”).

Colour is not used as the only method to convey importance or information.

Text and backgrounds provide sufficient color contrast

Provide text alternatives for non-text content so that it can be changed into other forms people need, such as large print, braille, speech, symbols or simpler language.

Media components include at a text-based alternative (e.g., transcript or closed captioning) as needed.

Complete program can be navigated using the keyboard (tab accessible).

All web content meets expectations of Accessibility for Ontarian’s with Disabilities Act.

See Web Accessibility customizable quick reference for guidance on labelling and formatting content and other strategies to ensure accessibility.

This checklist has been drawn from two existing resources:

  1. UNMC E-Learning Module Scorecard, posted by the Office of Academic Affairs, Interactive E-Learning Program, UNMC. Modified with permission.
  2. Adapted in collaboration with Online Learning Strategies. Resource: Online Module Guidelines, which was previously adapted in collaboration with Michal Kasprzak. Resources: Digital Education Strategies, DES Online Course Development Quality Assurance Checklist, Ryerson University; Kidney et al., (2007), Toward a Quality Assurance Approach to E-Learning Courses, International Journal on E-Learning 6(1), 17-30; S. Uvalic-Trumbic and Sir J. Daniel, Eds., (2012), A Guide to Quality in Online Learning, Academic Partnersips; European Foundation for Quality in eLearning, (2014), Open ECBCheck.]
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